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1. It gives you another perspective of your class.

When someone from outside steps into your classroom, they see things that you are often too busy to pay attention to. That is why having a pair of “fresh eyes” in your classroom can help you solve problems more easily than you think!
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2. It helps you see what you are not doing.

We often are caught on a routine in the classroom that can prevent us from trying new approaches and innovating in our daily practice. Someone observing your class can give you hints that can remind you of things you already know, but simply forgot to add to your plans!
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4. It allows your coordinators to get to know how you work.

It is very important that your superiors know exactly how you act and react inside your classroom. This is the only way they can back you up and truly trust your work.
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3. It helps you see what you are doing right.

The observer can also highlight the positive aspects of your class, as well as the good actions that can be enhanced.
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7. It alerts you against your bad teaching habits.

An outsider can alert you against annoying habits you may not be aware of: words or expressions you repeat over and over, your body language, your notion of space (or lack of) inside the classroom, etc.
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5. It allows your coordinators to feel the rapport between you and your students.

We know that what underlies good teaching is the quality of your relationship with your students and this is a highly valued asset for the school.
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6. It exposes you to new possibilities when presenting content and classroom management procedures.

We tend to repeat procedures and stick to the same practices just because they seem to work. When an outsider steps in, they can show us new possibilities to present the same content and fresh ways to deal with everyday issues.


LIVRO RECOMENDADO